Blog Posts – Food Research & Action Center http://www.frac.org.php56-17.dfw3-1.websitetestlink.com Food Research & Action Center Thu, 17 Jan 2019 19:17:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.9 Expanding the Reach of Afterschool Meals in the Nation’s Capital http://www.frac.org.php56-17.dfw3-1.websitetestlink.com/blog/expanding-the-reach-of-afterschool-meals-in-the-nations-capital Tue, 08 Jan 2019 01:49:37 +0000 /?post_type=blog&p=6317 January 7, 2019 When the school day ends, far too many children return home to empty refrigerators and bare cupboards. The federal Afterschool Nutrition Programs provide healthy meals and snacks to children to ensure they are fed after school (and on weekends and during school holidays). According to FRAC’s latest Afterschool Suppers: A Snapshot of […]

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January 7, 2019

When the school day ends, far too many children return home to empty refrigerators and bare cupboards. The federal Afterschool Nutrition Programs provide healthy meals and snacks to children to ensure they are fed after school (and on weekends and during school holidays). According to FRAC’s latest Afterschool Suppers: A Snapshot of Participation report, the District of Columbia had the highest participation in the nation of children in the Afterschool Supper Program, with a 31.6 percent increase in participation between October 2016 and October 2017.

However, D.C. still has much room to grow: in October 2017, D.C. served only 21.7 children afterschool suppers for every 100 that received free and reduced-price school lunch. We at D.C. Hunger Solutions (DCHS) are building upon the District’s success to further grow participation in afterschool meals.

We are still celebrating the passage of the Healthy Parks Amendments Act of 2018, which became law in November 2018. The new law requires the D.C. Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) to offer all youth attending a DPR-sponsored afterschool enrichment program a supper through the Afterschool Nutrition Programs. DPR is one of the largest providers of afterschool programming in the District, and increasing the reach of afterschool meals through DPR will help ensure more low-income children receive a supper once their classes wrap up for the day.

The passage of the Act was driven by a broad-based collaboration. DCHS worked with diverse stakeholders — afterschool program providers, food vendors, and others — to better understand how to expand the reach of afterschool meals in D.C., and later draft the language that would become the basis for the Healthy Parks Amendments Act. Councilmember Mary Cheh played a key role in developing the Act. After the drafting process, DCHS worked with our diverse coalition partners to educate the community about the benefits of afterschool meals and to galvanize support for the bill.

Now that the Healthy Parks Amendments Act is officially law, the next step for DCHS and the District is to ensure its full implementation. DCHS is advocating for full funding to implement the Act, and we are providing technical assistance and advice to DPR as they serve more afterschool meals to more children. DCHS is also partnering with afterschool program providers, youth advocacy groups, and grant-making organizations to secure more funding for afterschool programs — the sites where children access afterschool suppers and snacks.

DCHS hopes that our efforts, alongside those of our partners and other advocates, will expand the reach of both afterschool programs and meals in 2019 and beyond so more children have the opportunity to learn, be active, stay safe, and eat healthy while their parents are working. By forging strategic partnerships and providing outreach and technical assistance, we are connecting more children with afterschool meals and hoping to continue leading the nation in participation in the Afterschool Nutrition Programs.

To learn more about D.C. Hunger Solutions, visit the DCHS website.

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Remember This December: Hunger is Solvable With School Lunch http://www.frac.org.php56-17.dfw3-1.websitetestlink.com/blog/remember-this-december-hunger-is-solvable-with-school-lunch Fri, 21 Dec 2018 17:52:13 +0000 /?post_type=blog&p=6279 December 21, 2018 During the holidays and all year long, millions of individuals and families who struggle against hunger are able to access healthy food with support from the federal nutrition programs. To celebrate the nation’s nutrition safety net, FRAC is releasing a seven-part “Remember This December” series that will highlight the impact of seven […]

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December 21, 2018

During the holidays and all year long, millions of individuals and families who struggle against hunger are able to access healthy food with support from the federal nutrition programs. To celebrate the nation’s nutrition safety net, FRAC is releasing a seven-part “Remember This December” series that will highlight the impact of seven important federal nutrition programs.

This is the seventh installment of the series, which focuses on school lunch. Read the previous installment on school breakfast.

In FRAC’s most recent How Hungry is America? report, the national food hardship rate for households with children was found to be approximately one-third higher than the rate for households without children. Fortunately, millions of children across the country can access meals at school to reduce the impact of facing poverty and hunger at home. Find out more about the impact of school lunch below:

  • School lunch ensures children are ready to learn throughout the day: The National School Lunch Program — the nation’s second-largest federal nutrition program after the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) — provided lunch to 21.5 million children on an average school day throughout the 2016–2017 school year. The vast majority of schools (over 90 percent) participate in the program.
  • School lunch is critical for classroom achievement: School lunch fuels children’s minds, helping to boost academic performance, support overall cognitive development, and reduce behavioral problems.
  • School lunch provides children with the nutrition they need: Reimbursable meals must meet federal nutrition standards. National School Lunch Program lunches provide one-third or more of the recommended daily levels for key nutrients. Research indicates that children who participate in the National School Lunch Program have superior nutritional intakes compared to those who bring lunch from home or otherwise do not participate.
  • School lunch is being offered at no charge to 10 million students who attend high-poverty schools: Community eligibility increases participation in school lunch (and school breakfast) and dramatically reduces administrative burdens, allowing schools to focus on serving nutritious and appealing school meals instead of dealing with paperwork.

Learn more about school meals at FRAC.org, and share our “Remember This December” school meals graphic.

Click to tweet: #RememberThisDecember that hunger is solvable with the federal nutrition programs, including the National School Lunch Program! Learn more about the impact of #schoollunch w/ @fractweets latest blog: http://bit.ly/2rL928u

Watch our video on the importance of federal the nutrition programs.

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Remember This December: Hunger is Solvable With School Breakfast http://www.frac.org.php56-17.dfw3-1.websitetestlink.com/blog/remember-this-december-hunger-is-solvable-with-school-breakfast Fri, 21 Dec 2018 17:38:40 +0000 /?post_type=blog&p=6278 December 21, 2018 During the holidays and all year long, millions of individuals and families who struggle against hunger are able to access healthy food with support from the federal nutrition programs. To celebrate the nation’s nutrition safety net, FRAC is releasing a seven-part “Remember This December” series that will highlight the impact of seven […]

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December 21, 2018

During the holidays and all year long, millions of individuals and families who struggle against hunger are able to access healthy food with support from the federal nutrition programs. To celebrate the nation’s nutrition safety net, FRAC is releasing a seven-part “Remember This December” series that will highlight the impact of seven important federal nutrition programs.

This is the sixth installment of the series, which focuses on school breakfast. Read the previous installment on the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP).

The School Breakfast Program provides millions of children a nutritious morning meal each school day. School breakfast is a critical support for struggling families trying to stretch limited resources and provides children a significant portion of the daily nutrition they need to learn and be healthy. Find out more about the impact of school breakfast below:

  • School breakfast helps to fuel children’s minds and bodies: Throughout the 2016–2017 school year, 12.2 million low-income children on an average day participated in the School Breakfast Program, equipping them with the nutrition they need to boost their ability to learn effectively; support positive social, emotional, and behavioral development; and improve their health and general well-being.
  • School breakfast matters in every corner of the country: The School Breakfast Program operates everywhere and its accessibility is particularly important for low-income students in rural communities, who are more likely than their peers in metropolitan areas to live in food-insecure households and often face additional barriers to accessing school breakfast.
  • Schools are making breakfast more accessible through breakfast in the classroom: A growing number of schools are moving breakfast out of the cafeteria and making it part of the school day to ensure that students are able to participate. FRAC has worked with partners to develop tools [1, 2] to support principals in implementing and sustaining Breakfast in the Classroom and other alternative breakfast service models at their schools.
  • States are prioritizing school breakfast by enacting legislation to increase participation: In 2018, New Jersey, New York, and Washington joined Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and West Virginia by passing breakfast expansion legislation.
  • Community eligibility is a win for everyone: The Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) is a powerful tool that allows high-poverty schools to offer school breakfast and lunch at no charge to all students. Community eligibility reduces administrative paperwork for schools, increases school meal participation, removes the stigma that can surround accessing a free or reduced-price school breakfast or lunch, and makes it easier for schools to offer breakfast in the classroom.

Learn more about school breakfast at FRAC.org, and share our “Remember This December” school meals graphic.

Click to tweet: #RememberThisDecember that hunger is solvable with the federal nutrition programs, including the School Breakfast Program! Learn more about the critical support #schoolbreakfast provides w/ @fractweets latest blog: http://bit.ly/2BBs1XB  

Watch our video on the importance of the federal nutrition programs.

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The USDA Has Proposed a SNAP Rule That Would Increase Hunger and Poverty. What’re Next Steps for Anti-Hunger Advocates? http://www.frac.org.php56-17.dfw3-1.websitetestlink.com/blog/the-usda-has-proposed-a-snap-rule-that-would-increase-hunger-and-poverty-whatre-next-steps-for-anti-hunger-advocates Thu, 20 Dec 2018 21:57:46 +0000 /?post_type=blog&p=6266 December 20, 2018 On the heels of the President signing the 2018 Farm Bill that protects the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) from cuts proposed by the House, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) today proposed a SNAP rule that would reverse one of Congress’ key decisions and leave thousands of Americans ineligible for […]

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December 20, 2018

On the heels of the President signing the 2018 Farm Bill that protects the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) from cuts proposed by the House, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) today proposed a SNAP rule that would reverse one of Congress’ key decisions and leave thousands of Americans ineligible for SNAP.  The rule would limit states’ ability to waive time limits applied to some adults without dependents in areas with insufficient jobs, reducing access to nutrition assistance for people unable to find adequate hours of work.

The USDA maneuver not only runs counter to the new Farm Bill’s preservation of existing area waiver provisions, but it also threatens to increase hunger and nutrition-related diseases in our nation. The proposed rule is expected to be published to the Federal Register as soon as December 26, and will be subject to a 60-day public comment period. FRAC will be working with anti-hunger stakeholders and allies to mobilize opposition to the proposed rule and, overall, continue to fight to protect SNAP.

Jim Weill, FRAC President, released a statement on the rule:

The Trump Administration today proposed a Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) rule that would diminish food assistance for unemployed and underemployed people in areas with insufficient jobs; undo long-settled regulations; cynically attempt to end run Congress; and increase hunger and nutrition-related diseases.

In 1996 when Congress enacted time limits on SNAP (then called food stamps) for certain adults who were unable to document sufficient hours of work each month, Congress provided that states could request from USDA waivers on the time limits for areas with 10 percent or higher unemployment and for areas with few jobs. The area waivers are important, albeit insufficient, safety valves for protecting food assistance for persons who are seeking but unable to find sufficient hours of work. In the decades since, USDA has abided by the decision of Congress and processed area waiver requests from governors of both political parties based on accepted economic factors and metrics.

The Administration now proposes to politicize the process at the state level, reduce the ability of states to follow Congress’ intent, and arbitrarily narrow states’ ability to waive the time limit in areas with insufficient jobs. Its action flies in the face of congressional intent, coming just days after Congress passed a new Farm Bill that left the current area waiver provisions in place. The Administration’s release of its proposed rule sends struggling people a cruel message this holiday season — not one of hope and goodwill, but one of greater hunger and hardship if the rule is adopted.

Visit our Legislative Action Center to stay updated on the latest news regarding the proposed rule.

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Remember This December: Hunger is Solvable With CACFP http://www.frac.org.php56-17.dfw3-1.websitetestlink.com/blog/remember-this-december-hunger-is-solvable-with-cacfp Wed, 19 Dec 2018 16:41:32 +0000 /?post_type=blog&p=6236 December 19, 2018 During the holidays and all year long, millions of individuals and families who struggle against hunger are able to access healthy food with support from the federal nutrition programs. To celebrate the nation’s nutrition safety net, FRAC is releasing a seven-part “Remember This December” series that will highlight the impact of seven […]

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December 19, 2018

During the holidays and all year long, millions of individuals and families who struggle against hunger are able to access healthy food with support from the federal nutrition programs. To celebrate the nation’s nutrition safety net, FRAC is releasing a seven-part “Remember This December” series that will highlight the impact of seven important federal nutrition programs.

This is the fifth installment of the series, which focuses on the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Read the previous installment on summer meals.

Since being introduced in the late 1960s, CACFP has provided millions of children with meals and snacks in various settings, including child care centers, home day cares, Head Start Programs, afterschool programs, and homeless and domestic violence shelters. Older adults and adults with disabilities also have received nutrition through the program. Read more on the impact of CACFP:

  • CACFP matters for millions of children: In 2017, the program provided daily more than 2 billion meals and snacks to 4.4 million children in child care centers, family care homes, and afterschool programs. The majority of CACFP participants are preschool-aged children.
  • CACFP also matters for adults: In 2017, the program offered nutritious meals and snacks to 131,000 elderly or disabled adults each day.
  • CACFP supports the health of children: Through providing nutritious meals and snacks along with ongoing training, technical assistance, and support, CACFP ensures that children receive a healthy diet, grow healthy and strong, and develop good nutrition habits early in life.
  • CACFP spurs economic activity: The program’s funding supports local economies by purchasing required healthy foods at grocery stores and farmers’ markets, supporting jobs in the care sector, and helping working families work.
  • CACFP supports child care: In addition to providing access to healthy meals and snacks to eligible children at participating sites, CACFP plays a critical role in improving the quality of child care programs and making them more affordable for low-income families.

Learn more about the program at FRAC.org, and share our “Remember This December” CACFP graphic.

Click to tweet: #RememberThisDecember that hunger is solvable with the federal nutrition programs, including CACFP! Read about the impact of CACFP w/ @fractweets latest blog: http://bit.ly/2QQsChB

Watch our video on the importance of the federal nutrition programs.

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